An NHS mental health unit in Dundee restrained patients by pinning them down for too long and in a dangerous position, according to a leaked report.

The internal inquiry into the Carseview Centre was commissioned in response to a BBC Scotland documentary last year.

It exposed bullying and potentially life-threatening restraint on patients.

The report has not been made public but has been seen by the BBC.

It found that untrained staff were carrying out risky restraints on patients and that the number of restraints was high.

It said face-down, and particularly face down in a prone position, are the highest tariff interventions of physical restraint, and the most dangerous techniques to deploy.

The report looked at a sample of 40 cases and found more than half were patients being restrained face down on the floor for longer than 30 minutes.

The longest restraint was one hour and 45 minutes.

"That is completely against all guidelines," Prof Tyrer said.

"You may have to do things for five minutes or up to 10 minutes but to go beyond 40 minutes there is something badly wrong in the organisation of a unit if that is allowed to continue."

Carseview is a hospital to care for patients with mental illness from depression and anxiety to schizophrenia and psychosis.

In July last year, BBC Scotland broadcast allegations by patients of bullying by staff, illegal drug-taking and being pinned to the floor unnecessarily.

Experts called it abusive and said the unit should be closed down.

NHS Tayside responded by commissioning an internal report into Carseview to go alongside independent reports into mental health in Tayside.

The internal report says a whistleblower has come forward and accused Carseview of "very serious concerns over leadership, safety and malpractice".

It came up with 11 recommended actions including urgent action on staff training and critical action on illegal drugs on the ward.

It said the restraint policy should emphasise the safety of patients as well as staff and that the culture of the unit should be "based around the caring and compassionate leadership approach".

NHS Tayside said the recommendations covering patient care and culture were "now being progressed".

Joanne Purvis, Director of SecuriCare says, “There is no excuse for this sort of thing. The injuries seen in this photo speak to both the techniques being sued and the culture within the unit. It cannot be allowed to happen yet again..”

SecuriCare offer a range of courses designed to enable individuals to deal with all facets of conflict, aggression and violence. These include ‘personal safety’, ‘conflict management’, ‘dealing with challenging behaviour’ as well as our physical skills ‘Train the Trainers’ pathway

For more information and to discuss your unique needs: E: trainers@securicare.com or T: 01904 492442

See the full story at BBC News